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20/10/2016 | BlogOther

NDIS Explained

What is NDIS?

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a national funding scheme that funds reasonable and necessary support to children with a disability and those who care for your child. It provides support for those aged 0-65 years of age with a disability. The NDIS can help you get support within your community as well as funding for therapies or equipment.

Who is eligible?

To be eligible, children must have a disability or impairment which is likely to be permanent, which limits their ability to participate in their community, and perform day to day tasks without support from a carer or assistive technology

OR

Have a permanent disability or developmental delay which would likely benefit from receiving supports now with the aim of reducing the amount of support in the future

OR

Be a child under 6 years of age with a developmental delay and the delay means your child usually need more help with their self-care, communication, learning or motor skills than another child of the same age.

Your child must also:

  • Be an Australian resident or hold a Permanent Visa
  • Live in the NDIS roll out zones (rolled out in stages). In 2019 all Victorians will be able to access NDIS.

My child currently accesses Better Start for Children with Disability (Better Start) or Helping Children with Autism (HCWA) funding. What will happen to this when NDIS rolls out?

Once NDIS rolls out in your area, you will be transitioned from your current funding to NDIS. You should receive paperwork about this if your child is currently receiving funding. You can also call NDIS on 1800 800 110 to request this paperwork. You must complete this paperwork as quickly as possible and return this or your child’s current funding may stop.

How do I access NDIS funding?

If you are in the rollout zone and are on current funding, you should have received paperwork (see above). If you do not currently have funding, contact NDIS on 1800 800 110 to request the necessary paperwork. If your child meets the eligibility requirements, an NDIS professional will arrange to meet with you and your child.

Children aged 0-6 years

If your child is aged 0-6 years, you’ll meet with an NDIS early childhood partner.

In this meeting, you’ll discuss your child’s needs and goals.

You’ll talk about the support your child currently gets from family, friends or service providers and how well this support works for your child. And you’ll talk about general things like how your child usually manages daily activities, and more specific topics like how much support you think your child needs for certain tasks.

This might take more than one meeting, and your child might also need to be assessed by a specialist.

Your NDIS early childhood partner will work with you to decide on the supports your child and family need. Depending on your child’s needs, the NDIS early childhood partner might:

  • give you information or emotional support
  • refer you to mainstream services like community health services, playgroups or peer support groups
  • provide or help you find short-term or medium-term early intervention for your child – for example, speech therapy or occupational therapy.

If your child needs more intensive, individualised or longer-term support, your NDIS early childhood partner can recommend that your child quickly moves to an individualised support plan.

Your early childhood partner will help you develop the individualised NDIS support plan for your child and submit it to the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) for approval.

 

Children aged 7 years and older
If your child is aged seven years or older you’ll meet with an NDIA planner or an NDIS local area coordination partner.

You’ll talk about your child’s needs and goals. You’ll also talk about the support your child gets from family, friends, mainstream providers (like the education system) and community activities or service providers. And you’ll talk about how well this support works for your child.

You’ll also talk about general things like how your child usually manages daily activities, and more specific topics like how much support you think your child needs for certain tasks.

This might take more than one meeting, and your child might also need to be assessed by a specialist.

You and your NDIS professional will work together to develop an individualised NDIS support plan for your child. The plan will then be given to the NDIA for approval.

What is an individualised NDIS support plan?

Children with intensive or longer-term needs might be able to access an NDIS support plan. Your child’s individualised support plan will be based on her goals or the goals you have for your child. It will cover the support your child needs to meet these goals.

Your child’s plan will include:

  • informal support that you and your family give your child
  • support from community services and mainstream providers, like the support you get through the education system (not funded by NDIS)
  • support that is funded by the NDIS.

NDIS-funded support might include therapies, technologies or equipment to help your child with daily living activities, or modifications to your home. It could also include your child’s existing support if you’re happy with it.

You keep using the programs and services funded by HCWA/ Better Start until you have an approved NDIS support plan in place for your child. This plan will replace the HCWA/ Better Start plans once it is ready.

What if my child can’t access the NDIS?

If your child gets support from Helping Children with Autism (HCWA) but doesn’t meet the requirements to join the NDIS, he’ll keep getting support from HCWA. The Australian Government Department of Social Services will manage this funding until your funds are spent, or your child reaches the maximum age for the scheme, whichever happens first.

Will my child be worse or better off under the NDIS?

With the NDIS, your child will get support that gives her at least the same outcomes that she gets with HCWA or Better start support. This doesn’t mean that your child will get exactly the same types or level of services or resources as he gets with HCWA.

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) will consider your child’s needs as well as the types and level of support she’s getting with HCWA.

NDIS support won’t end when your child is seven years old. The NDIS can be lifelong, depending on your child’s needs over the years. These needs may fluctuate and with this, the funding will fluctuate too.

Sensational Kids are registered service providers under NDIS.

Once your NDIS plan is approved, Sensational Kids are able to provide services to your child.

 

Glossary:

  • NDIS early childhood partner Organisations that are experienced in early childhood intervention and that offer families support, advice and access to early intervention and the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). If your child is aged 0-6 years, you’ll work with an NDIS early childhood partner to decide on support and services for your child and family. NDIS early childhood partners were previously referred to as access partners.
  • NDIA planner: A person who works for the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), which runs the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). NDIA planners draw up individualised plans for NDIS participants. If your child is aged seven years or older, you might work with a planner. What the professional you work with is called will depend on what’s available in your area, but the level of service that you get will be the same.
  • NDIS local area coordination partner: A National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) partner who works with NDIS participants to draw up individualised plans. Local area coordination partners can also give you information and help you get supports. If your child is aged seven years or older, you might work with a local area coordination partner.

References: Raising Children Network (website) and NDIS website

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